fbpx

Never Set Impressive Goals — They Never Work

When it comes to building systems around your goals, be careful not to bite off more than you can chew. Often, we know what we want our lives to look like, and we understand the goals that we need to hit to get there.

For instance, on a typical day, if I’ll finish my work, I’ll need to work for about 6 hours uninterrupted. However, I (and by extension, we) often neglect what the current systems in our life are.

In case you don’t understand what I mean by systems, check out my article on systems vs. goals.

Image for post
Image from: Pinterest

Back to my example, I don’t finish my work because I’m always distracted, and I work for maybe 3 hours in total, cumulatively. However, I can spend 6 hours in front of my laptop. Instead of setting an unreasonable goal like working for six work hours, I need to study the system I currently employ.

What usually happens when I work, is that I work for about 15 minutes, then get distracted by my phone, so a new system might be “Work for 25 minutes without looking at your phone, then take a break of 5 minutes to look at your phone.

While it doesn’t look as impressive as “Work for 6 hours”, it’s more achievable.

This is important because the goal is to GET BETTER, not look like I’m getting better.

Image for post
Image from: The Tiny Life

Setting goals that look impressive is like attempting to benchpress 100kg of weight because there’s a beautiful lady in the gym when you have only been doing 50kg.

That pace is not sustainable, and you’ll only damage your muscles. While you might impress the lady, it does nothing to your main goal, which is to build up your muscles.

The solution: Be brutally honest with yourself, what does your current system look like?

When you know it, design a system that’s just a little better. It’ll not be impressive, but that’s fine. The most important thing is that it’ll work.

And you need that momentum to make that system work and achieve more goals.

So, in conclusion, don’t set impressive goals. Set achievable goals and build systems that are easy to achieve.

You want to hit that sweet spot between too hard that it’s unachievable and so easy that it doesn’t challenge you.

So, what are your goals? And what systems are you putting in place? Let me know in the comment box below.

Oh, subscribe to my newsletter if you haven’t already so that you get notified when I put out new posts. Cheers!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top